Ford and Volkswagen MPV Forums

Large MPVs -- Ford Galaxy / VW Sharan / SEAT Alhambra: => Ford Galaxy / VW Sharan / SEAT Alhambra => Topic started by: bigjeeze on December 20, 2015, 09:02:13 AM

Title: Limp Mode - Any pointers
Post by: bigjeeze on December 20, 2015, 09:02:13 AM
I Have just acquired a 2003 Galaxy TDi Auto. It has 173k on the clock and apart from an intermittent limp mode runs perfectly.  I drove it 110 miles yesterday from London to Bournemouth and apart from one episode which was "fixed" by stopping and turning the engine off then on again it was absolutely trouble free.  I know this is a subject that has come up many times but I can't remember what exactly is the way to test and repair.

I have it in my head that it is an electrical issue (relay) as by it;s intermittent nature it doesn't seem to be physical. However, I do have a spare manifold, egr and Turbo should it prove to be so.

Any suggestions as to how I can test it would be greatly appreciated.

Once I have sorted this I intend to swap it for my wife's MK1 which though still going fine at 160k is getting a little tatty.

Cheers

BJ
Title: Re: Limp Mode - Any pointers
Post by: insanitybeard on December 20, 2015, 09:31:56 AM
If you can scan with VCDS to see if any fault codes have been stored to point you in the right direction then I'd suggest that first. Relay 109 can cause problems but not sure if they are more of a non start variety than limp mode. Other common causes would include sticking turbo vanes or defective vacuum control, dirty or worn position sensor contacts on the electric throttle pedal, possibly MAF sensor etc. Injector wiring loom issues tend to cause misfiring as opposed to a limp mode I think, but I would expect several of the things I've listed to log a fault code.
Title: Re: Limp Mode - Any pointers
Post by: johnnyroper on December 20, 2015, 09:57:04 AM
I would hazard a guess that it will have an overboost fault code logged if you check it on vcds,probably down to sticking VNT.
If you don't have access to vcds yet then you could grab hold of the actuator rod on turbo and see if it feels smooth or stiff and rough in operation
Title: Re: Limp Mode - Any pointers
Post by: bigjeeze on December 20, 2015, 06:56:46 PM
Checked with VCDS it comes up with these two codes.

17964 charge pressure control : negative deviation
P1556-35-10 -----intermittent.

00300 - Transmission fluid temp sensor (G930  27-10- Implausible signal - intermittent.


The second one - has anyone any idea where this sensor is located?


Cheers

BJ
Title: Re: Limp Mode - Any pointers
Post by: johnnyroper on December 21, 2015, 09:13:04 AM
I think the temp sensor is within the gearbox and requires the sump taking off to replace.
However it could be a sign all is not well with the box rather than sensor failing, it is possible that an internal fault could be causing trans fluid to be taking incorrect path inside box filling sump with hot oil rather than through cooler. Or could simply be needs oil change.
Personally I would replace fluid with correct ATF then see if it cures problem failing that would get an auto box specialist to take a look.
Title: Re: Limp Mode - Any pointers
Post by: HOW MANY GOES TO REGISTER on January 08, 2017, 11:50:38 AM
I had similar problems. We changed both camshaft and crankshaft sensors. This problem is no longer present.
Title: Re: Limp Mode - Any pointers
Post by: dandad on January 08, 2017, 07:01:45 PM
Had the same problem, turned out to be a vacuum leak, which was at the servo end of the brake vacuum pipe, it also caused the brake pedal to go rock hard occasionally, Easy fix though. It will pay you to check the actuator  arm on the turbo as mentioned above, get a spanner on it and work it back and forwards if it's stiff, best of luck.
Title: Re: Limp Mode - Any pointers
Post by: Chrispb on January 09, 2017, 12:24:03 PM
Before doing anything clear codes and take for a drive again.
Underboost is more associated with leaking pipework but don't rule out sticking turbo vanes as they can still be the cause. Exercising the actuator  would be a good start and give you an idea if it's moving smoothly and full movement to the stop then returning under spring pressure.
You can also observe the lever while getting someone to start the engine, it should move to the full load position, if it doesn't check out the small vacuum hoses and possibly N75 valve